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INCORPORATING

LR PARTNERS IN PROJECT TO DESIGN 3D-PRINTED BOAT HULL

Tuesday, September 24, 2019 

Lloyd’s Register and its charitable parent company Lloyd’s Register Foundation are partnering with Singapore’s National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC), Autodesk, ST Electronics and AML3D to launch a global design competition offering a first prize of S$30,000 (c£17,500) to the winner of the best innovative design idea for a 3D printed rescue boat hull.

This will be the first ever full-scale rescue boat which will be delivered by 3D printing. Large scale 3D printing allows for complete design freedom versus conventional manufacturing and enables development of better performing complex hull structures; and the ability to embed advanced control systems and sensors, pushing the boundary of what is possible in traditional ship building.

This initiative follows a recent project funded by Lloyd’s Register Foundation (LRF), in which a digitally enabled steel pedestrian bridge was successfully 3D printed in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

As the first organisation to publish Guidance Notes on how to certify laser printed metallic parts in partnership with The Welding Institute (TWI), LR claims its reputation as a leader in 3D printing is growing globally. The company’s specialist additive manufacturing team has recently qualified 3D printing facilities in Asia-Pacific with 3D Metalforge and AML3D as well as Shell’s Technology Centre in Amsterdam.

Launched by NAMIC the competition is the first part of a three-phase project to build and qualify a 3D printed rescue boat hull with autonomous sensors.

“This is a great competition for any shipbuilder, shipyard, manufacturing company or design business interested in submitting their designs with the possibility of winning a significant amount of money to develop their idea using additive manufacturing techniques,” said Hussain Quraishi, Innovation Lead at LR’s Digital Innovation Hub in Singapore. “We’re particularly looking for entries which embrace the freedom that Additive Manufacturing allows to develop new novel hull designs.”

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